Argentina Lithium Begins Drilling at Incahuasi Salar

Argentina Lithium & Energy Corp. (TSXV:LIT) (FSE:OAY2) (WKN:A0RK7E) (OTC:PNXLF) (“Argentina Lithium” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it has started the first drill program at its 100%-controlled Incahuasi Lithium Brine Project in Catamarca Province, Argentina.   The program was originally scheduled to begin in early February but was delayed due to prolonged heavy rains.

“We are excited to have our drill program at Incahuasi underway,” said Nikolaos Cacos, President and C.E.O. “The program should proceed expeditiously andwe are looking forward to the first ever drill results from this salar.”

The Incahuasi salar is situated within the “Lithium Triangle” of Argentina and Chile, and has characteristics prospective for lithium-rich brines.   Initial sampling of near-surface brines returned up to 409mg/L lithium, and geophysical surveying indicates the potential for lithium-rich brines at depth. (See News Release dated November 6th 2017, filed on SEDAR).

This initial program program includes 4 diamond drill holes to depths of approximately 400 metres.  The holes are designed to test two highly conductive domains identified by a Vertical Electrical geophysical survey (VES), and interpreted as brine bodies, along 12 kilometres parallel to the long axis of the salar (see Figure 1: https://argentinalithium.com/assets/docs/JAN-30-Drilling.pdf ).

The Incahuasi Lithium Project

The Salar de Incahuasi is located in the northwest of Catamarca Province at approximately 3260 metres above sea level, in the southern half of the “Lithium Triangle”. Access to the Incahuasi salar is by gravel road, approximately 34 kilometres southwest from the town of Antofagasta de la Sierra.  The salar is approximately 17 kilometres long north to south, and 2.5 kilometres wide, and divided into a north and south section.  The geological environment at Incahuasi is similar to other salars in the Puna region where lithium and potash are found. The northern portion is flatter, partially covered with surface water, with crusts Continue Reading

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